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Bariatric surgery

What is Bariatric surgery

Bariatric surgery, also known as weight loss surgery, is a surgical procedure that helps individuals with obesity or severe overweight to lose weight. The surgery involves reducing the size of the stomach, altering the digestive process, or both, which can result in significant weight loss. The goal of bariatric surgery is to improve or resolve health conditions associated with obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, and heart disease. Bariatric surgery is usually considered as a last resort for individuals who have not been able to achieve significant weight loss through diet and exercise or have health conditions that are worsened by obesity.

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Symptoms of Bariatric surgery

Bariatric surgery is not a medical condition, but rather a surgical procedure used to treat obesity. As such, there are no symptoms associated with bariatric surgery itself. 

  1. Pain and discomfort in the abdomen or incision site

  2. Nausea and vomiting

  3. Diarrhea or constipation

  4. Feeling full quickly or being unable to eat large amounts of food

  5. Changes in bowel movements or digestion

  6. Fatigue or weakness

  7. Changes in mood or emotions related to the stress of surgery and the lifestyle changes necessary for weight loss.

It is important to note that these symptoms are temporary and should improve over time as the body adjusts to the changes made by the surgery. 

Causes of Bariatric surgery

Bariatric surgery is not caused by any specific condition or disease, but rather is used as a treatment option for individuals who are severely overweight or obese and have been unable to achieve significant weight loss through diet and exercise alone. The main cause of bariatric surgery is obesity, which is typically defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher. Obesity is a complex condition that can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, lifestyle choices, and environmental factors. Factors that may contribute to obesity include a sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, genetics, hormonal imbalances, certain medications, and underlying medical conditions. Bariatric surgery is generally considered a last resort for individuals who have not been able to lose weight through other methods and are at high risk for health complications associated with obesity. The surgery works by reducing the size of the stomach, altering the digestive process, or both, which can result in significant weight loss and improvement in health conditions associated with obesity.

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Treatment

  1. Bariatric surgery is a surgical procedure that is performed to help individuals who are severely overweight or obese to achieve significant weight loss. The surgery works by reducing the size of the stomach, altering the digestive process, or both, which can help to limit the amount of food that an individual can eat and improve the body's ability to absorb nutrients. There are several types of bariatric surgery, including gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, adjustable gastric banding, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch.

  2. Before undergoing bariatric surgery, individuals will typically need to undergo a comprehensive evaluation to determine if they are a good candidate for the procedure. This evaluation will typically involve a physical exam, medical history review, and various tests and screenings to assess the individual's overall health and the extent of their obesity.

  3. After the surgery, individuals will need to follow a specific diet and exercise plan to help them achieve and maintain their weight loss goals. This may include consuming smaller, more frequent meals, avoiding certain foods, and incorporating regular physical activity into their daily routine.

  4. In addition to weight loss, bariatric surgery may also help to improve or resolve a variety of health conditions that are associated with obesity, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, and heart disease. However, as with any surgical procedure, bariatric surgery carries risks and potential complications, and individuals should discuss the benefits and risks with their healthcare provider before deciding to undergo the procedure.

FAQs around Bariatric surgery

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